Ramona Louise Wheeler

Beyond the Far Horizon


Who is he?
He is Osiris.
In other words, his name is Re.


Osiris and Re are aspects of the same ultimate mystery of being. They are identified separately because the substance of the soul can exist without consciousness, without awareness of itself. Osiris was busily building your body out of molecules and parental love long before you were aware of yourself. Osiris’s hieroglyphs and name are Seat/Throne of the Eye. Osiris is the throne of the Eye and the Eye is Re. You, your sense of being you, lives inside the command-center in your brain, seated, more or less, between and above your eyes. This is the still point of Buddhist teaching, the central monad of archetype. Osiris is the mystery of being; Re is the perceptive power of that mystery, and they both travel through Duat. The soul is the center and throne of consciousness.

I have always liked the practicality of the Egyptian metaphor of the soul as a chair, a seat, a throne. This is about your life, about everyday people in everyday life, the magnificent paradox of an eternal being sitting down in an ordinary room and doing ordinary human things; the “soul chair” as seat of the eye of consciousness is profoundly accessible.


A popular name for Osiris was Wennofer, which means Beautiful Being or Joy of Existence. When Osiris was born, a “mighty voice” cried out that the greatest of the gods had been born. You are Osiris and, in ancient Egyptian terms, that makes you important. You are the tip of your own pyramid and the roots of your being go down to the Nun, the primal quantum fields that sustain reality. Osiris is your entire pyramid of being, including the Seeing Eye of Re at the tip.


Orient your face, Lord of Radiance, façade of the original home and face of my head,
Darkness and twilights, I carried you.

My soul, I purify you.
My two hands are around you.
Your portion at the top is the gift of your ancestors.

Give me my voice.
I will speak with it.
I pilot my heart in its hour of fire and dark.


One of the oldest known names for Osiris is Khent Imenty, Façade of the Western Horizon. The word for façade is khent, a term met with in sacred poetry. This is also translated as foremost, at the front of, on the face of. The hieroglyph itself is a wooden rack for displaying water or wine jars. The metaphor of wine and spirit is very old; the Greeks equated Osiris with Dionysus, their god of wine and ecstasy, the means of entering Duat. Imenty, the western horizon, is also a metaphor for the world of the Next Life, as in the God Beneath the Horizon. Osiris is most often shown in mummy wrappings because he is everything which survives death, and in that form he is Lord of the Westerners. Imenty are the “Westerners,” in other words, the sacred dead. The place on the horizon where the Sun set was Ro Setau, Mouth of the Far Horizon, where the sky goddess Nut swallowed Re each night; the journey through Duat began there. Just as the label on a wine bottle represents the contents, not the bottle, Façade of the Western Horizon represents the contents of the sacred territories behind Osiris, not just the tomb. As Khent Imenty, Osiris gave a human shape to Duat.

Now I Am Osiris! This is the victorious conclusion of scenes in holy writ and tombs. “Osiris” is a title for the deceased, added to names and titles in address because you have become purely Osiris. This metaphor was so widely understood that free-lance scribes who produced copies of the Book of the Dead could write in “Osiris,” then simply leave “NN” and a blank space for the next client’s name. From the beginning to the end of the nation’s history, Osiris was a popular god, especially in the stories and events based around his family. Perhaps this deep and abiding love for their own souls was the source of Egypt’s reputation among her contemporaries for piety and spirituality.

The djed icon is Osiris’s counterpart to the ankh icon of Isis, and the birthplace of Osiris, Busiris, is represented by paired djed columns. Djed is drawn as a banded column, tapering upwards, with four flat disks ringing it at the top; the colors hint at its association with the tamarisk tree which grew around Osiris’ coffin in the Legend of the Pillar of Osiris. The djed was painted on the inside of the coffin beneath the spine of the mummy, and gold or ceramic djed amulets were wound within the linen wrappings. The drawings of the djed are sometimes quite imaginative, with eyes and arms holding symbols of power and concentration.

The word djed is often translated as stability, or enduring. There are two different definitions of what the djed was represents, but that double meaning is the clue to its sophisticated metaphorical intention—djed is both the vertebrae of the spine and a wrapped bundle of wheat stalks, because Osiris is the vital force that flows through the spine to activate your mind as well as the vital force that flows through the living plant. The force is the same in both, that is to say, Osiris. Conscious perception is the flowering of the spinal column within the flesh.

The will to action is made manifest through the nerves of your spine, and Egyptians believed that this will power is given you by your soul within. They certainly knew that if the spine is sufficiently damaged, flesh no longer responds to the will, and they were knowledgeable enough to have separate words for “spinal column” and “spinal cord.” This is the power evoked by the djed. An important ritual was the raising of the djed column, symbolizing the free flow of will power in Duat.


“You are made living and green within the dual-worlds out of my immortality,

embodied in the hand of the Lord To The Limits.


He is led about by that which is not evolving in his name, Earth Is Led About By The Face.

He draws the dual-worlds together in his name that is Sokar.


His power opens up much mightiness in his name that is Osiris.

He has been on the two-fold path millions of years out of his name, Joy of Being.”


“I am Osiris, Lord of the Mouth of the Horizon, a portion of Osiris immortalized as that being at the top of the steps.

I have entered at the desire of my heart through the Pool of Paired Flames.

I am quenched!


Orient your face, Lord of Radiance, façade of the original home and face of my head,

Darkness and twilights, I carried you.


My soul, I purify you.

My two hands are around you.

Your portion of the head is the gift of your ancestors.


Give me my voice.

I will speak with it.

I pilot my heart in its hour of fire and dark.”


Continued in The Birth of Osiris.